VANCOUVER EASTSIDE MISSING WOMEN

CONTENTS

HOME

GUESTBOOK

1st GUESTBOOK

NEWS UPDATES

CONTACT US

             
                         

Reward for missing women



Courtesy of The National-CBC TV, Wednesday, April 28, 1999

PETER MANSBRIDGE: A 100 thousand dollar reward is being offered tonight in a case that has police in Vancouver stumped. Since 1995 nearly two dozen women have gone missing from the city's poorest neighbourhood. As Terry Milewski reports, there are growing fears it could be the work of a serial killer.

(FILE FOOTAGE) SARAH DeVRIES: This is heroin.

TERRY MILEWSKI: Sarah DeVries disappeared a year ago and no one has a clue what happened to her. But DeVries was well known in Vancouver's downtown east side. Six years ago she was on CBC describing how she became a prostitute to pay for her drug habit. She was addicted to heroin and cocaine and she had no illusions about her likely fate.

(FILE FOOTAGE) SARAH DeVRIES: There are three ways to go. You can go to jail, you can end up dead or you can end up being a lifer down here.

MILEWSKI: But being a "lifer" on the streets of the east side seems to be even more hazardous than she thought. In fact since 1995, 23 women including DeVries have simply disappeared without trace: No word to friends or family. Bank accounts untouched. In some cases, children left motherless. In all of these disappearances there seems to be no explanation. No bodies have been found, no evidence of any crime. But inevidently there is a suspicion out there that a serial killer is on the loose.

MAGGIE DeVRIES / SISTER OF SARAH DeVRIES: I think my sister has been murdered. And in many of other cases I feel the same after talking to their families.

MILEWSKI: The families and friends of the missing women agree that they would not just vanish, leaving all their belongings behind. Liz Evans runs a downtown hotel where one of them lived for six years: Angie Jardine. Evans is keeping Jardine's room just in case and says she always kept in touch.

LIZ EVANS / ANGIE JARDINE'S FRIEND: We saw her all the time. We always knew where she was. If she wasn't around for a couple of days we knew why she wasn't around for a couple of days. She's appear. Somebody would always see her. She was known by a lot of people. We were her friends and her family.

MILEWSKI: But many such friends and families felt the police were not taking the disappearances seriously enough. And in response, today the city and the province put up a 100 thousand dollar reward for information.

UNIDENTIFIED: Passed unanimously.

MILEWSKI: Even so, many of those close to the missing women believe it's too late. That they are not just missing. Terry Milewski, CBC News, Vancouver.


THE NATIONAL
CBC-TV
Wednesday, April 28, 1999
22:00:00 ET
22:25:00 ET
TERRY MILEWSKI, Reporter; MAGGIE DeVRIES, Sister of Sarah
DeVries; LIZ EVANS, Angie Jardine's friend; UNIDENTIFIED
PETER MANSBRIDGE

MISSING ANGELA- E Q U I N O X-1999

Calgary Sun-Top Story-Aug 9, 1999

Hit By Deja Vu-Feb 25, 2001

 

Email: wleng#missingpeople.net 

Missing Women Tip Line: 1-877-687-3377

Updated: August 21, 2016