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Missing women inspire Vancouver CD


Courtesy of THE GLOBE AND MAIL

By ALEXANDRA GILL
Monday, April 22, 2002 

VANCOUVER -- A group of Vancouver musicians is marking the tragedy of the city's 50 missing women with a tribute CD.

More than 40 singers gathered at Mushroom Studios last Thursday night to record the chorus to A Buried Heart.

Proceeds from the song, which was written by Wyckham Porteous, Gary Durban and John Ellis, will be used to raise money for a drug-detoxification centre for sex-trade workers from the city's Downtown Eastside.

"It's a cause we could actually do something about," said John Wozniak of Marcy Playground, who was joined by John Mann, lead singer for Spirit of the West, and Jerry Doucette, who recorded his platinum hit Mama Let Him Play in the same studio 25 years ago.

The producers hope that some of British Columbia's bigger stars will lend their voices to the CD, which is to be released at the end of May. Colin James and the Vancouver roots trio, Be Good Tanyas, have already agreed to sing parts of the lead vocals, while actresses Molly Parker and Gabrielle Rose have come on board to recite spoken-word segments for the video. Porteous says they are now in discussions with people representing Nelly Furtado and Bruce Cockburn, among others.

The soulful rock song refers to the "ghostlike" missing women "with tracks and four-inch heels" and the cops who "sell excuses/ Like they offer you a deal." Porteous says the alleged neglect on the part of the Vancouver police department, which has now expanded its investigation with the RCMP's Joint Task Force, "is a huge part of the story. To ignore it would be dishonest."

The local singer-songwriter, who wrote the lyrics and came up with the concept before discussing it with other artists at last month's West Coast Music Awards, says he has been horrified for years by the lack of concern about the missing women.

"But the final indignity, to me, happened when they started to refer to that place as a pig farm. Here was their final resting place, and the women still weren't getting any respect. I said to myself, 'There's got to be some dignity here.' "

Courtesy of the Toronto Globe and Mail

Tribute to missing women
A Buried Heart
http://www.aburiedheart.com 

 

Email: wleng#missingpeople.net 

Missing Women Tip Line: 1-877-687-3377

Updated: August 21, 2016