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Book on missing women betrays trust, families say

GLOBE AND MAIL
By JANE ARMSTRONG

Wednesday, April 23, 2003

VANCOUVER -- Years before Robert William Pickton was arrested and charged with killing 15 women, Lori Shenher was a Vancouver police detective investigating the baffling disappearances of scores of skid-row prostitutes.

Among many families of the missing, she was trusted above other cops. She attended vigils and memorials for the missing women and took calls from frantic relatives late at night.

Now, some of those families say they feel betrayed at news that Detective Shenher is writing a book about the infamous case of missing women, which eventually mushroomed into the biggest murder probe in Canadian history.

It has also prompted a debate on the ethics of a police officer using inside police information -- some of it gleaned with a badge -- to tell a story from which she might eventually profit personally.

"I think that's a conflict of interest because she's still working as a police officer," said Deborah Jardine, whose daughter, Angela, disappeared in late 1998 when Det. Shenher was assigned to the missing women's file. At the time, Det. Shenher was one of two officers working on the case.

"I don't agree with that whatsoever," added Ms. Jardine in a telephone interview from her home in Sparwood, B.C. "It would be different if she was a retired police officer. But she's still employed with the Vancouver Police and that really perturbs me and I'm sure it would for the other family members."

Det. Shenher is on maternity leave from the Vancouver Police Department and did not respond to attempts to reach her.

Her Toronto literary agent, Michael Levine, won't comment on her work, adding he was inundated with calls after an article in Report on Business magazine noted he was representing Det. Shenher. Mr. Levine said he intends to be "totally discreet" about his client's work.

News of Det. Shenher's book caught the Vancouver Police Department off guard.

Its spokeswoman, Constable Anne Drennan, said she first heard of it through a reporter and contacted the detective at home to confirm it.

Constable Drennan said the detective did not tell the department she was writing a book, adding it raises dicey privacy issues.

"Obviously, we would be very unhappy to see anything released in any way that would jeopardize either the case that's before the courts or any further future investigation."Its spokeswoman, Constable Anne Drennan, said she first heard of it through a reporter and contacted the detective at home to confirm it.

Constable Drennan said the detective did not tell the department she was writing a book, adding it raises dicey privacy issues.

"Obviously, we would be very unhappy to see anything released in any way that would jeopardize either the case that's before the courts or any further future investigation."

Courtesy of the Globe and Mail

No missing women's book, police say-Apr 23, 2003

Missing Sarah, A Vancouver women remembers her vanished sister-2003

Book chronicles disappearances-Nov 25, 2001

News articles with former lead Detective Lori Shenher-2003

 

Email: wleng#missingpeople.net 

Missing Women Tip Line: 1-877-687-3377

Updated: August 21, 2016